For Some of Us, Libraries Might NOT Exist

SPARKLING LETTERS BOOK BLOG- FOR SOME OF US LIBRARIES MIGHT NOT EXIST.jpg

Hello everyone! ♥

Last week I got busy and didn’t have the time to blog or reply to comments so I’m so sorry for being kind of missing 😛 but now I’m back with another discussion post. You probably realized that I’m usually super organized with my post but today, I’m not sure where I’m going with it so I’m just gonna wing it 😛

A couple weeks ago, I stumbled across some similar conversations about library.

The first is about problematic books. With the ongoing rise of diversity, people have been raising awareness of the problematic aspects of popular books, the latest being the controversy regarding Carve the Mark. Many issues have been brought up and we were encouraged to not support the book through buying it. But then some people say, “I’m aware of its problems, but I still want to read it, what am I supposed to do?” then some people reply by saying, “Just check it out from the library. Don’t give the book your monetary support.”

The second is about piracy. A blogger posted something about other blogger asking her for an epub version of a book. As you can guess, the response was… harsh. People were bashing the blogger in question and say things like, “that’s disgusting, libraries exist!” or “there’s library!!!” and every other similar sayings. Be aware that I do NOT condone or support piracy, but that’s not the point of this post. An author also tweeted that, I quote, it is so easy to use a library instead of pirating.

Forget about problematic books and piracy (for now), I’m not gonna talk about it. But that solutions telling us to check out the books from library? It doesn’t work for everyone. And that’s what I’m going to talk about today. A few months ago I mentioned it briefly on my post about the struggle of international bookworm but since most people seem to not get it yet, I guess it bears saying again.

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Different in library system.jpg

This might be news for some of you but for a lot of us, libraries don’t provide popular YA books. In Indonesia, libraries are educational. They have plenty of educational or general books like encyclopedia and dictionary and all that. They also have a lot of children’s books, because apparently they only care to encourage children’s to read, not adults :’) sure they have some teenlit books but most of them are locals and from years ago.

The library itself is so rare. Most cities have their own public libraries but they are… old. Old, dusty, and the stocks are super limited. Plus it’s not cozy like you may imagine. School and university libraries are better, but they’re educational. My uni library is pretty amazing when it comes to psychology textbooks and journals but they don’t have anything recreational.

Tasya, my fellow Indonesian blogger also agreed with me. She bluntly said that the library here sucks 😅 There are barely any “modern” books, and when there are, it’s limited to teenlit. Apparently, this doesn’t only happen in Indonesia, because on my previous post, a lot of international bloggers also said that they experienced the same thing.

Anushka said that in India, they hardly have any good libraries and that she’s so jealous of people having access to well-stocked libraries. Jordyn lives in US now, but before that she lived in South Africa for 9 years and she said that when she walked into a library in the US, she was speechless. SPEECHLESS. She didn’t know that libraries could have YA books because in South Africa, all the books were either educational, or for little kids. Kate said that in Phillipines, there’s almost no such thing as public libraries. Kate’s university library has a small collections of contemporary fiction but it’s definitely not enough. Fadwa also wrote this thoughtful post a while back about the issue of access to books and piracy based on her experience living in Morocco.

Even if libraries exist and provide recreational reads, as a non English speaking country we don’t get as much English books. Imported books are simply not as common as local books. I mostly buy my books from Book Depository because they’re not available here. Clearly they won’t be available in our local libraries.

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That being said, for some of us the only legal way to read books is through buying it, either physically or as ebooks. That’s why we don’t have the choice to just read a book without supporting it with our money. I’m not writing this post to make people feel bad for having a better circumstances, or god forbid for justifying piracy. That’s not what I’m talking about right now—even if I completely understand where they come from.

I never regret not living in US or UK or any other countries with better access to books and I never resent those who are. I guess… I just want people to know that not everyone has the same easy access to books we’d like to read. To remind people that the life of a bookworm is more difficult for some of us, that there are a lot of people who aren’t as lucky. We all know that piracy is wrong, not to mention illegal and unethical, but when someone asks for a pdf/epub version of a book, maybe stop a bit and think about their possible circumstances before attacking them and saying that there’s library, because maybe there isn’t. Not for them. Come up with a better solution or tell them not to pirate gently.

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Alright, that was the end of my ramble! I feel like I had zero direction on where I wanted to take this conversation to but I hope I got all my points across?hehe now I want to hear your thoughts! Do you have easy access to books and libraries? Or do you not? Tell me your thoughts and experience because I’d love to hear them all! ♥

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78 thoughts on “For Some of Us, Libraries Might NOT Exist

  1. First I want to tell you that I love your post, always be so sweet and your posts are very interesting, second, in my case I am from Argentina and here the libraries are mostly educational, ie, that people go to her mostly for school work: /. It is quite sad but is what it is

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Ah, such a great discussion! I live in the U.S., so I’m lucky, but sometimes I feel not so lucky because my library’s YA section is small. Not super small, but small enough that new books come in every couple months. I’m constantly jealous of all the libraries that have all the YA releases weeks after they published while I have to wait for it or hope that I’m going to get money sometime soon. 😝 Buying books is the only reason I’m considering a job. 😂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. This was a great post! For a lot of us, especially those of us who live in the US never think about how easy it is to pick up a book from the library, or of the other opportunities we have here. I really appreciate this post because it gives an insight to a place that I don’t know much about. I think a lot of the time it is easy to come to a quick conclusion and judge someone when in reality things are never clear at the surface, thanks for reminding me and others that things don’t work out the same for everyone, that we shouldn’t jump to conclusions and take the time to listen to others point of view.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Tiana! 😀 yeahh I mean, it’s fair considering that most international best seller are published in the US/UK but I just want people to know that the situation isn’t the same for everyone. And I’m so glad I managed to get all my points across and that this post is helpful to you hehe exactly! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. My co-blogger and I have been fairly vocal at times, dissuading ebook piracy, but any time we mention the library that is definitely with the caveat we are talking about people who actually have a library. I think this is a great post because you clearly explain what it means to not have a library (which I think is so sad!). Because I know people, personally, who when they say they “can’t get to the library” mean something like “I don’t want to drive 20 minutes” or “I can’t drive so I’d have to walk there or take the bus and I’d rather not.” There is a huge difference between these people and readers who legitimately do not have libraries within a reasonable travelling distance. Anyone who does have a library should be very grateful for it, I think.

    I don’t really know what the situation is in other countries, but maybe someday some of you awesome bloggers will be able to work on making libraries more common in some way. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think that’s a good consideration, since people who have library within reasonable distance have an option to borrow but instead choose piracy so that’s just wrong hehe but yes, for people like me, libraries simply don’t exist. There’s no way in my world I could get popular YA books in English in my library so I buy all my books and yes it’s sad! 😦

      My friend and I actually have this dream to build a library! I’m into fiction so much and she’s into non fiction so we thought we could combine both our interest to make a great and resourceful library 😀

      Like

  5. Thank you for writing this post. I agree with everything you wrote, and the problem of access to books needs to be recognized. Most people just take it for granted that everyone has access to libraries but that is so not true. Also, I’ve seen this general notion that being a reader, if you don’t use a library you’re not a ‘good reader’ or you’re not a supporter of borrowing books. Or the notion that if I don’t use a library, I’m proud and not doing my duty. Which hurts. Because it is such a wrong notion and is not true for everyone. I’m glad you wrote this 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Anushka! Your comment on my previous post is actually on the many reasons I decided to write this 😛 exactly! People just assume that the situation is similar for everyone, that we could *just* go to a library when it fact it’s significantly different! I hope my post could be eye opening and thank you again 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I really love this post, and you underline some interesting issues I think we should talk about WAY more. Living in France, I don’t have many popular YA books in my library in English. Many of them are translated and released in French, but…well, I want to read in English so that doesn’t help, so I end up buying all of my books whether in physical copies or ebooks.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. This is such a great point. People tend to forget everyone doesn’t always have the same situation as them. Another difference is that in the US, it’s free to get a library card in many places, but it costs money in some countries (and even some places in the US, I think). Not to mention, every library doesn’t have every book, so some books may not be available even if someone does have a good library!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes they do! I really hope my post could be helpful and eye opening hehe ohhh I never knew about that, thanks for bringing it up! Oh yes, that’s why people need to be more aware and shouldn’t just assume everyone has the same situation 🙂

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  8. This is a great post! I live in Spain, where we have a lot of great public libraries, but there are literally no books in English but some classics I already own, and I don’t enjoy reading translations that much.

    It’s so much more expensive to be an international bookworm. Even if we have BookDepository, which has free shipping, readers in the US have BookOutlet and local bookshops with discounts and all. That’s why a lot of people read illegal PDFs and the sort. But of course, everyone should do their best to support the authors.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. This was such an important post! I haven’t really seen anyone speak up about this, which is a pity because it’s always interesting to get a little bit of insight into what it’s like for other bookworms. I have been to Indonesia, and I completely agree with everything you said. Not that I stayed long enough to go and visit libraries, but the bookshops themselves were quite different in regards to content.

    For some people, I might understand why they feel the need to pirate books (although like you said, I’m not endorsing it). I suppose a little bit of it, is about the online book ‘culture’ where everyone is always grabbing for the new releases. I do believe that it is super important to support the authors whenever you can though! Without them, there would be no books.

    Fleur @ FranklyBooks just posted DRIPPING WITH BLOOD | 2 GRAPHIC NOVEL REVIEWS

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Fleur! 😀 me too! At first I thought it was because it only happened in MY country but then I posted about the struggle of international bookworm and bloggers from all over the world told me they have the same problems :’) ahh really? The bookshelves are alright, even if they take some time for new releases to arrive and sometimes some books simply aren’t available here ahaha but the libraries are pretty much non existent 😦

      I agree! I don’t condone it either but I could definitely see where people come from hehehe 😛

      Like

  10. Yesss! 👏 people from first world countries tend to forget that not everyone is as priviliged as them, not all of us have easy access to books, let alone a library. I don’t mean to be harsh, but it’s true that our library sucks😬 It’s no wonder our reading interest is so low, it’s hard for young adults to find interesting books in our country!😬 I really wish the government at least try to pay better attention to the libraries…
    Btw I tagged you for the ruler of books tag! 😀 I hope you’ll check it out 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    • I know right! I think they just assume that libraries exist all over the world, that’s why I really hope my post could open their eyes hehehe 😛 nahhh it’s true, library here sucks haha me too! I hope it gets better so it gets easier for people to read books 🙂 ahh alright I’ll go check it out, thank you Tasya! ❤

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  11. I love this, I think the people who jumped at the person asking for an epub version should take a minute and look at themselves to realise ‘hey maybe I should consider the circumstances in which she is asking for one’ rather than making her feel guilty. Libraries are a privilege not everybody has, I myself live in the UK in a small town and my library is very small. They rarely have new stock unless I wanted to request it, although requesting books also costs a small fee. Now I have a job and earn money, reading is alot easier for me because I can afford to buy them.
    If you are young and have no money then something epub’s are your only hope to read a book you are dying to read. I’m not justifying piracy because of course that takes away an authors revenue etc but sometimes it’s a readers only choice, I can’t fathom how hard it must be to live in a country with little to no books and being a book lover.
    Also I don’t think some people realise that alongside libraries not having the book, some books are actually banned from being sold in countries such as Harry Potter.

    I love this, I love that your speaking up and educating people.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Exactly! I’m not justifying piracy but every time I see someone attacks another person for asking epub and telling them that it is SO EASY to go to library, I die a little inside because it’s not easy. Libraries are non existent where I (and a lot of others) live hehe </3 oh yes! Being a bookworm while still in school is definitely more difficult! 😦

      Exactly! I feel like this whole situation falls more under the gray area, rather than simply black and white ahaha oohhh I didn't know some countries ban Harry Potter! What a huge loss 😦

      Liked by 1 person

  12. I couldn’t agree more with you on this post. I for one would love to get my books from the library, but libraries are NOT as stocked in other places like they are stocked in the USA or UK. Most books I really want to read aren’t even translated to my language, let alone made available in libraries. And most libraries don’t even have a section of Books in English, and when they do, they are mostly limited to classics or some really old thriller books. I probably wouldn’t buy a single book if I could get the books I am interested in reading in my library, but alas I can’t. And judging by your post and the comments, most international bloggers can’t either. So it’s so great that you mentioned this!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you! I’m so glad that you could relate to my post because really, not everyone is as lucky hahaha most libraries in my country also only have classic books and I’m just not interested hehe I agree! I probably would read so much more if I have a good library here 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Right?! This drives me crazy. I live in a small city in England and so many libraries near me have either downsized drastically, or have completely shut down. The library closest to me doesn’t have the novels I’m interested in reading (they’re very old books). Libraries are accessible to so many people I think they forget that not everyone is so lucky… Thank you for bringing this up!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. This was such an enlightening post, I’m SO glad you wrote about this! I’m studying to be a librarian in the US, and I don’t know very much about libraries in other countries. This was really informative to read, and interesting to think about. It’s a shame that A. people were calling people out for things they don’t have access to and B. that your libraries aren’t well-stocked or encouraging of teen reading. Thanks for posting this!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you! 🙂 ohhh good for you! But yeahh apparently libraries in other countries have different systems. From what I gathered from the comments, it seems like most libraries only provide educational books, children books, or classics 😦 yesss I hope people don’t just jump to conclusion and start attacking others and cheers to a better library system! ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  15. I’m so glad I read this post! The library I worked in (in the US) was part of a system where other libraries from around the state would send books back and forth if you placed a hold on them. I tried to tell people about this service often, and was confused by people’s surprise. I guess what I’m saying is: thank you for pointing out this privilege. We (myself included) take so many things for granted, and it’s important to be reminded that not everyone has access to the same resources.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m so glad you loved it! 😛 ahh I’m sorry I don’t understand the whole library system hehe but yes, definitely not everyone has the same access to books (or other resources) so I’m kind of sad seeing people just assume and all that hehehe thank you! 😀

      Like

  16. Your post touches on a very relevant and important topic. I do not feel that you addressed anything in an offensive manner. What you have done is shed light on something that needs to be remembered.

    I live in the US and right now access to a wonderful library system here in Portland that provides a great variety or reading material and media. However, I grew up on the other side of this country in a very poor community. All libraries were forced to close with only two remaining with the surrounding cities. And those two had to alternate days open. Needless to say selections were outdated and finding books for research was a sad joke. So your post hits home for me.

    The limited access to books is something that affects all demographics. I believe it is important that we all remember this. I am sure library recommendations are definitely never meant with any hurtful intention, of course they are not. But you raising awareness is of great value! So thank you ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • That’s a relief hahaha 😛 Ahh I’m so glad you could relate to my post. I’ve been there. When I was working on my thesis, even looking for books for educational purpose was difficult. I had to e-mail the researcher/scientist, explain my own research and ask for a copy of their journals. Thankfully they’re pretty nice and willing send me ebooks & e-journals 😀

      Exactly! I know that people probably are just unaware, but it’s still annoying when people, ESPECIALLY AUTHORS, attack readers and tell them to go to library because libraries are non existent here. It’s the truth 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Wow! Great post! I live in the US and have 3 awesome libraries within 30 minutes drive, but here’s my situation… I’m totally blind, so libraries full of print books do me absolutely no good unless I can convince a sighted friend to read to me, which I hate doing. Braille books are expensive and bulky, so I can’t really build up a collection of them. There are online libraries that provide eBooks to the blind for free, but they’re starting to produce only text books and have none of the newer stuff. Technically I can read Kindle and iBooks on my phone and iPad, but it really is NOT a pleasant experience because getting a braille display to stay bluetooth to my iPad is easier said than done, and I hate listening to the default screen reader voice read lengthy things because it sounds like a robot with a stopped up nose… Also, if I accidentally touch the screen while I’m reading, I’ll lose my place, and finding it again when u can’t see the screen is nightmarish. All this could easily be solved if I had an epub that could be opened in Voice Dream Reader, which is an amazing app that reads documents in several really good sounding voices. I absolutely refuse to resort to piracy because I want to be a published author myself, and I wouldn’t want people pirating my books. My only other option is to convert all my Kindle books to epub. This is a direct violation of Amazon’s service agreement, but in my opinion they should make their apps accessible if they don’t want me converting their stuff. I always pay for the books honestly, and in my opinion I should get to read them in whatever program I want since I’ve paid for them. I hate doing this because I feel like a criminal, but it’s not like I’m turning around and selling the converted books. I’m just trying to level the playing field here and get the same reading experience as every other sighted reader who buys a Kindle book. Yeah, it’s technically illegal, but if Amazon doesn’t like my means of accessing their content, they can fix it! The second I see an update that gives me equal access to the Kindle app, I will remove all traces of converted books and piracy software from my computer. Sorry for the accessibility rant, but there’s my two cents! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you! 🙂 ohh I’m so sorry. I can’t relate to your situation but I’m sure it’s more difficult than mine. I’ve seen braille books on my uni library but I almost never seen a popular YA braille book 😦 I also never know about that Braille app hehe but a few months ago I talked to someone whose job is converting regular books to Braille books. He said it was illegal and he’s breaking some laws and copyright rules doing that but there’s just no other way. I hope publisher, librarians, or app developers could work more on it so that books are accessible to absolutely everyone! ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  18. This is such a great, eye-opening post. I’d thought about it in a general, vague way I guess, but never actually gave it proper thought. I live in Canada, and I’ve been incredibly blessed to have easy library access. My elementary school and high school both had great libraries with fairly extensive collections, and my local public library is fantastic. Over the last few years they’ve expanded their YA section and if you can’t get a book from the local library, you can request it from a different library anywhere in the province. I always knew I was lucky, but now I see how truly lucky I am. Thank you for this post. ❤

    ~Marie @ Ramblings of a Daydreamer

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you! 🙂 ahh that must be nice hehe but yes, libraries are kind of privileges not everybody could access. I personally am not too bothered because I’ve lived like that all my life hahaha but it’s kiiiind of annoying when people just assume 😛 no worries 🙂

      Like

  19. I love this post! I live in Australia and I am very lucky because I have an amazing library system that has all the books I want and if it doesn’t, it’ll bring them in for me! This was such an eye opening post for me! I don’t know what the system in Indonesia is, but would there be any way for you to maybe request your council or library to bring a few books in?

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  20. Your post is amazing, and I think it’s great that you’re drawing attention to this. Some people (myself among them, in all honesty) are so used to the idea that libraries exist and are a thing that it’s easy to forget that different parts of the world use their libraries for different purposes, if they even have them at all. I can understand your frustration, and kudos to you!

    ~ Michelle @ FaerieFits

    Liked by 1 person

    • Aww thank you! 😀 I knoooow haha I realize that when people refer other people to go to the library they probably assume libraries exist everywhere. But it’s still annoying when people, especially authors, attack other people when in fact they *don’t* understand the circumstances. Thank you! 😀

      Like

  21. your post is sooo relatable! I totally know what you mean although I think we’re luckier here in my place, the Philippines. University libraries offer a bit of fictions but unfortunately, they aren’t much. They’re not even that updated. Also, when I graduate from Uni, I won’t have access to libraries anymore ’cause local libraries only have books for research purposes #sadlife. SO I always buy the books I want to read and I totally envy those who live in the US for having libraries.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ahh I’m glad you could relate to my post! 😀 so I’ve heard! Ahh that sucks. I’ve never had libraries all my life so even if it sucks, I’m fine with it. Not having access to libraries after having it when you were in uni must be a tad more frustrating 😦 me too! If only they know how lucky they are hahaha

      Liked by 1 person

  22. This was such a relatable post! I live in Brazil and I have literally no libraries in my city. I know that, people who live in the countryside or far from the bigger cities have a lot of problems with finding libraries, because this isn’t common, at all. Libraries in my country tend to be for university purposes, so you’ll find a lot of text books, but hardly ever YA novels, especially new releases.
    That’s why I always felt like a lonely sheep. When I mention that books are very expensive in my country, people just tell me to find a library. However, there aren’t any around home, and I’d have to ride for at least 20min to the closest library, without any guarantee that they’ll have releases.
    I can understand, then, when people say that they don’t have a choice but to buy a controversial book and, therefore, support it with their money. I’m very thankful because I believe this post will be eye-opening for many people that think libraries are available for everyone around the globe, when in most part of the times, that’s not the case.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ahh glad you could relate to my post Lais! Sameeee they provide a lot of text books and all that but when it comes to recreational reads, they’re pretty much non existent 😦 omg yes! With the different currency, shipping cost, and additional tax, books are more expensive, that’s why TBD is my life savior hahaha 😛 exactly! Same goes for ebook piracy, it’s wrong but sometimes some people simply have no choice 😦

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  23. This is such a great post. It’s so easy to forget that not all bloggers are based in the UK or the US and even then, not all bloggers live in densely populated areas. Not everyone has the same access to books and they certainly don’t all have access to libraries which stock all the most current releases. I know when I see books that many US bloggers get from their library I’m left in shock and when people mention the access they have to various books from their digital library I am in awe because my library, whilst good about having a lot of big popular releases, is not great about having less popular books or having a whole series available. It is easy to forget that not everyone has the same access to books as you do.

    I mean, I’m lucky to live in the UK and have a reasonably good library service available to me. I can easily borrow Carve the Mark from the library and read it if I wish, in fact, I plan to do just that. Not everyone else does, though. It’s easy to criticise others for buying books which are known to be problematic but people forget that often the only way for some people to get access to books is to buy them. I know I have that issue when it comes to a lot of the romance, and some less popular YA I reads. I can either buy it for myself or not read it at all. I’m someone has a fairly good library service so others who have nothing even remotely like my local library are forced into an even worse situation. I dread to think how costly a hobby reading would be if I also lived in a country where English isn’t the first language and have to struggle to get access to books because then it’s even more of a nightmare and your library probably won’t have many of the popular books.

    Basically, this post is a reminder to everyone that we aren’t all that privileged and to not take for granted the access we have to books. And also not to judge everyone for the books they buy when you don’t know how they have to get all of their books.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you! To remind people that not everyone has the same situation/privilege is my goal of writing this post 😀 exactly, I’m in even more awe when I see digital library, that’s so cool and I have no idea why my country doesn’t have that, seems easy hahaha ahh that’s my problem! I’m not eager to read Carve the Mark, especially after hearing so many problematic elements in it, but let’s say that at some point I want to, I have no choice but to buy it… or I could pirate it, but really, it’s not a black and white situation here hahaha thank you for your opinion! 😀

      Like

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  26. Lovely post. This is so true and I think a lot of people who DO have the opportunity to just easily check out from the library forget this. I’m from the US and my local library has all of the latest releases. I actually feel guilty when I DON’T use it because I know so many people around the world don’t have that luxury.

    Molly @ Molly’s Book Nook

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  27. I love this post so much! I was talking about libraries with another blogger recently and how not everyone has access to them. Although, both of us have access to decent libraries that do have YA I learned that her library didn’t have an ebook service like mine does. Of course, that’s not in the same realm as not having a library at all or having one that is for educational purposes only but it goes to show that not everyone has the same access to books as others do. I remember when all of that happened with that author calling out the reader and I completely agree with you on the fact that people need to think about other people’s circumstances before doing something like that. I know that one solution, for those with Kindles, is to lend people ebooks. However, I think that only works in the US which is dumb. I really wish there was a system to lend ebooks on a wider scale to other readers outside the US. It’s something I wish is a reality one day. Kind of like an online library that has the ability to give readers access to books on a worldwide scale. Great discussion, Puput!! 💕😊

    Liked by 1 person

    • I knooooowww hahaha but I honestly don’t mind so much because I never had it. You can’t miss things you never have, right?hahaha though I get annoyed when someone who knows better shove it on my face hahah I got especially annoyed when an author says it! I mean, you’d think they’re supposed to know about those stuffs but they don’t hahaha

      Ah yes! I hope we could have digital library someday because I think it would be less of a hassle than having a physical library! Who knows when (or if) it will ever come true :’) yayyy thank you Melissa! ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      • You would think that they would know but I think sometimes people just don’t pay attention to certain things. It’s easy to think everyone has something when you don’t know anything different and all of that. Which is why I love that I’m seeing discussions about it. 😊
        Right? I mean I like physical libraries but given that there is such a huge digital market now you would think it would be an option. But then again with library funding cuts going on it’s probably not happened because of that. Hopefully one day it will! If I had the ability to make it happen I so would.
        You’re welcome!! 😊💕

        Liked by 1 person

  28. Argh… Indonesian Library is really making me sad. Most of them only have old books.
    But talking about epub, in this “digitalized world” it is common thing to ask, am I right? I was thinking that library should have more into digital now. What do you think?

    Liked by 1 person

  29. What a great post!!! we often forgot not everyone lives like we do. If you live in the US or UK actually (like me) we are actually VERY LUCKY. MOST people in the world don’t live like us. MANY women in the world are actually not allowed to read! Thank you for posting this!

    Liked by 1 person

  30. This is such an important point to make. I think we often forget that libraries aren’t widely available or well stocked for everyone. I have easy access to a library but they don’t have a great YA section so I don’t use it a lot. Thanks for the great discussion!

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Pingback: January Wrap-Up || February TBR (2017) – She Latitude

  32. Pingback: Sparkling Letters 1st Blogversary : A Statistical Analysis & Lessons Learned | Sparkling Letters

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